Our Collection

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Using the Online Collection

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The Trevithick Society collections consist of objects and documents and photographic material in the physical world and the online collections consist of images and text about the physical objects.

The digital collections are designed to be viewed online to promote the collections and knowledge about them, but they also form a database useful for collection management purposes by the Trevithick Society.  The Trevithick Society management records are not available for public use.

The online collections management system designed for the Trevithick Society is developed from the fifteen Dublin Core elements including title, description, subject, date, format and with a unique identifier for each item recorded.

[fusion_accordion class=”octoggle” id=””][fusion_toggle title=”Read more information on DC elements” open=”no”]Developed from the need for standard methods for classifying and processing data published electronically the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set provides a multi disciplinary core set of 15 metadata elements designed to be easily shared with other organisations

  • Title
  • Creator
  • Subject
  • Description
  • Publisher
  • Contributor
  • Date
  • Type
  • Format
  • Identifier
  • Source
  • Language
  • Relation
  • Coverage
  • Rights

The Trevithick Society uses the DC data for managing digital assets and for collections management purposes there are additional elements containing information not available to the public. The Trevithick Society digital collections enables users to search for information online and to view text and images about real objects offline.[/fusion_toggle][/fusion_accordion]

 

From 1998, the Trevithick Society adopted a numbering sequence that normally appears as TS_1998_0000, the name of the organisation and the date numbering was initiated followed by a four digit sequential number. The unique prefix is missing from some records.

Where known, previous numbers have been recorded on the digital catalogue as they are often able to provide additional information, such as a transfer from one collecting organisation to another.

You can search the database using the TS number or previous numbers if you know the number of an item you are searching for.

The TS numbering system has been retained but previously unrecorded documents now have a unique ID number that helps identification by indicating the kind of item it is, who created it and with additional information in the sub-classification.

These numbers include an abbreviation of the person or organisation that created the item and searching with this will produce the collections required, e.g. all Holman Brothers records include ‘HOLM’ in the number sequence. If you wanted to search for records created by the Cornish Engine Preservation Society, you should search for ‘CEPS’. Records can additionally be searched for by using the numerical sub-classification.

[fusion_accordion class=”octoggle” id=””][fusion_toggle title=”Read more information on unique ID numbers” open=”no”]The Trevithick Society online collections database has incorporated previous records and identification numbers.

Previous Trevithick Society numbers have been retained for all items located, correctly identified and with digital images and text produced.

Where items are yet to be located and correctly identified, the database contains non standard numbering sequences, including Temporary numbers introduced by this project to eliminate errors in identification of un-numbered objects.

It is possible to search for items using non standard numbers but this is more likely to be of use to collections management officers.

Other numbers used in the database include Trevithick Trust numbers, an eight character number such as TT950001, where the first two numbers indicate year of accession; and numbers used by the Cornwall Record Office which holds certain Trevithick Society documents.

Where no previous number existed new records have been created and the unique identification number generated for each item identifies the type of item, the creator of the item and the sub category.

Trevithick Society documents have been numbered using a template used for Business archives which generates a unique number which is human readable and easily understood when searching for items.

The following example, DOC_CEPS_1_44 shows that the document was created by the Cornish Engines Preservation Society and is a corporate and governance record. The last part of the number, 44, is simply the next sequential number in this series. DOC_TS_2_27 is the Trevithick Society newsletter, number 27.

The unique number differentiates between documents, drawings, publications, maps, audio visual, photographs and miscellaneous items and the database can be searched for the range of DOC, DRG, PUB, MAP, AV, PHO and MISC records.

The unique number also uses numeric sub classification to further identify item type-

  1.  Corporate and governance records including Memorandum and Articles of Association; company set up and any constitutional changes; Minute books and supporting papers, key actions and decision making; Contracts and agreements, partnerships, associations, deals and procurement and annual reports.
  2. Communications records including Reports to shareholders; Press releases to market, investors, customers and staff; Internal management correspondence and memos, strategic issues and core activities; Press cuttings and articles.
  3. Financial records including Annual accounts; Audit/Finance committee minutes and supporting papers; External audits and reports; Income and expenditure ledgers.
  4. Human Resources records including Company employee rules and procedures, manuals, employee handbooks, pensions, insurance; Minute books from company sports and social clubs; Performance planning, bonus schemes and employee targets; Photographs of key staff; Photographs of sports and social events and awards; Staff magazines; Wage or staff books or registers, terms and conditions, pay rates, job type, hours.
  5. Property / Estates Management records including Architect’s drawings and files, building layout and design; Asset registers, evidence of property and other assets on the balance sheet; Photographs of premises, visual record of company property; Project files relating to major projects or developments; Title deeds, leases.
  6. Research and development records including research and development of products, committee minute books, technical evidence of product creation/production; Product packaging samples, artwork, pattern books; Product files, technical information about product development and marketing; Research & development reports, committee minutes and papers, evidence of innovation and technology investment and outcomes.
  7. Sales and marketing records including Advertising material, film, artwork, copy; communication to customers; product representation; Direct marketing campaign literature about products and services; Major customer files: information about key customer relationships; Market research & plans, market coverage and penetration; Order books; Point of sale material, product illustrations; Price lists, product lines and service catalogues; Stock books; Sales figures.
  8. Technical records including Plans, drawings and photographs, evidence of creation and development of products, important to understanding of nature of business.
  9. Artefacts and Memorabilia records including Works of art and antiques, publications, personal items formerly owned by staff, families, directors.

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The digital versions of the documents in the Trevithick Collections will be traced more readily using the unique identification number, but you can also use words to search for items by subjects, dates, keywords and associated people and places.

Incomplete records in the database are typical of social history object collections where provenance is often lost and we ourselves are keen to discover more about collection items with incomplete records.

We want you to enjoy making your discoveries and help us develop our understanding by sharing information you may have to connect items to places and people and help enhance our records. Please contact us as directed to give your views or share your knowledge.[/fusion_text][fusion_imageframe lightbox=”no” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” stylecolor=”” align=”center” animation_type=”fade” animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.3″ class=”” id=””] Supported by The National Lottery Heritage Lottery Fund[/fusion_imageframe][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Make a donation to the Trevithick Society